explore-blog:

In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their most famous characters blindfolded. Best thing since famous authors’ hand-drawn self-portraits, which invariably require a different kind of blindness. 

(via thenearsightedmonkey)

1,430 notes

newyorker:

Read about Christoph Niemann’s animated, rainy-day cover this week.

newyorker:

Read about Christoph Niemann’s animated, rainy-day cover this week.

(Source: newyorker.com)

3,579 notes

beouija:

I’m in the latest issue of the French magazine Télérama, which is devoted entirely to Shakespeare. I chose the women in Shakespeare as the subject I wanted to illustrate most & so got to do this fun spread on women in general and Lady Macbeth, Portia & Ophelia in particular. Thank you to AD Catherine Le Gallou. (There are a lot of amazing illustrators in this issue, including Christophe Blain & Gipi!)

beouija:

I’m in the latest issue of the French magazine Télérama, which is devoted entirely to Shakespeare. I chose the women in Shakespeare as the subject I wanted to illustrate most & so got to do this fun spread on women in general and Lady Macbeth, Portia & Ophelia in particular. Thank you to AD Catherine Le Gallou. (There are a lot of amazing illustrators in this issue, including Christophe Blain & Gipi!)

(via fantagraphics)

232 notes

fantagraphics:

Lucy Knisley is appearing at her first big event since the debut at SDCC and her book release! Starting Friday, September 26th at 7pm at Challengers Lucy will be signing and customizing your copy of her newest book from us, An Age of License. This travelogue follows recounts the artist’s charming (and romantic!) adventures on a book tour in Europe. The comic store has even gone to the kitchen to whip up some of her sweet and savory treats found in a previous graphic novel, RelishGet there early before the books sells out or else we highly suspect you’ll have to fight crowds, zombies and possible commit a misdemeanor.

133 notes

99percentinvisible:

"Film the blanks" poster series- can you guess which is which?

64 notes

shoesandsocks:

Um.
Shit.

shoesandsocks:

Um.

Shit.

4 notes

fantagraphics:

Praise for It Was the War of the Trenches

“’The war to end all wars’ has become a magisterial comic book to end all comic books. I seldom give blurbs, but this book is an essential classic. Among all of Jacques Tardi’s towering achievements as a comics artist, nothing looms larger than this devastating crater of a work. It’s a compulsively readable wail of Existential despair, a kaleidoscope of war’s dehumanizing brutality and of Everyman’s suffering, as well as a deadpan masterpiece of the darkest black humor. The richly composed and obsessively researched drawings — perfectly poised between cartoon and illustration — march to the relentless beats of Tardi’s three horizontal panels per page to dig a hole deep inside your brain. This is one Hell of a book.” – Art Spiegelman

"Tardi’s depiction of the First World War is so impassioned and visceral that it can be compared to the work of the artists who actually served in the trenches." – Joe Sacco

"French master Tardi gives an infantry-level view of World War I’s meat-grinder carnage in grim vignettes that primarily keep tight, telling focus on the stories of individual soldiers. …[It Was the War of the Trenches] deserves a place on the top shelf of graphic lit.” – Cliff Froehlich, St. Louis Post-Dipatch

Praise for Goddamn This War!

"As brutal and horrific as the Great War itself, this book rivals All Quiet on the Western Front when it comes to the insane idiocy of the conflict.” – Max Brooks

Tardi’s WWI: It Was the War of the Trenches / Goddamn This War!
by Jacques Tardi, with Jean-Pierre Verney

260-page black & white/color 8.25” x 10.75” hardcover • $39.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-769-7

Due to arrive in about 2-4 weeks. Click thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews, and pre-order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/tardiswwi

120 notes

comicblah:

This should be canon…

37 notes

99percentinvisible:

Throwback: before most cables ran underground, all electrical, telephone and telegraph wires were suspended from high poles

1,682 notes