fantagraphics:

Praise for It Was the War of the Trenches

“’The war to end all wars’ has become a magisterial comic book to end all comic books. I seldom give blurbs, but this book is an essential classic. Among all of Jacques Tardi’s towering achievements as a comics artist, nothing looms larger than this devastating crater of a work. It’s a compulsively readable wail of Existential despair, a kaleidoscope of war’s dehumanizing brutality and of Everyman’s suffering, as well as a deadpan masterpiece of the darkest black humor. The richly composed and obsessively researched drawings — perfectly poised between cartoon and illustration — march to the relentless beats of Tardi’s three horizontal panels per page to dig a hole deep inside your brain. This is one Hell of a book.” – Art Spiegelman

"Tardi’s depiction of the First World War is so impassioned and visceral that it can be compared to the work of the artists who actually served in the trenches." – Joe Sacco

"French master Tardi gives an infantry-level view of World War I’s meat-grinder carnage in grim vignettes that primarily keep tight, telling focus on the stories of individual soldiers. …[It Was the War of the Trenches] deserves a place on the top shelf of graphic lit.” – Cliff Froehlich, St. Louis Post-Dipatch

Praise for Goddamn This War!

"As brutal and horrific as the Great War itself, this book rivals All Quiet on the Western Front when it comes to the insane idiocy of the conflict.” – Max Brooks

Tardi’s WWI: It Was the War of the Trenches / Goddamn This War!
by Jacques Tardi, with Jean-Pierre Verney

260-page black & white/color 8.25” x 10.75” hardcover • $39.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-769-7

Due to arrive in about 2-4 weeks. Click thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews, and pre-order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/tardiswwi

101 notes

comicblah:

This should be canon…

26 notes

99percentinvisible:

Throwback: before most cables ran underground, all electrical, telephone and telegraph wires were suspended from high poles

1,497 notes

explore-blog:

Italian physicist-turned-sensor-developer Benedetto Vigna on how sensors are changing storytelling and the human experience of reality – a short animation for the 2014 Future of Storytelling summit.  

84 notes

"As a group, Millennials are as likely as older adults to have used a library in the past 12 months, and more likely to have used a library website. Among those ages 16-29, 50% reported having used a library or bookmobile in the course of the past year in a September 2013 survey. Some 47% of those 30 and older had done so. Some 36% of younger Americans used a library website in that time frame, compared with 28% of those 30 and older. Despite their relatively high use of libraries, younger Americans are among the least likely to say that libraries are important."

Major new Pew study looks at millennials’ reading habits. This particular finding is striking — all the more reason to partake in the Knight Foundation’s 2014 NewsChallenge, which seeks breakthrough ideas to “leverage libraries as a platform to build more knowledgeable communities.” Because, lest we forget, “when a library is open, no matter its size or shape, democracy is open, too.” (via explore-blog)

340 notes

minimooseontheloose:

Good Pizza Dog

minimooseontheloose:

Good Pizza Dog

(via fuckyeahhawkguy)

9 notes

explore-blog:

xkcd, wry as ever, considers the oft-debated impact of texting on writing skills. The xkcd book, What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions, is out today and a must-read. 

explore-blog:

xkcd, wry as ever, considers the oft-debated impact of texting on writing skills. The xkcd book, What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions, is out today and a must-read. 

984 notes

explore-blog:

Autostraddle tells it like it is. I guess that’s exactly what Alan Watts meant in 1951 when he admonished against the "orgasm without release" of media overload. 

Lest we forget, the psychology of fruitful writing does require a dedicated environment free of distraction. 

668 notes

nickleungphoto:

Finally have a reliable enough connection to update my blog. There are so many pictures I want to share from my Everest Base Camp Trek, but this is the one that took the most effort. After multiple nights of waiting for weather to clear, then learning that the Milky Way actually doesn’t come out of the horizon until after 1am, I finally got this shot outside of the village Gorak Shep at 3am. At 16,900 ft, Gorak Shep is the last village before Everest Base Camp. At this elevation, it is difficult to sleep, which ironically, helped me get out of my sleeping bag into the freezing night. I’ve never seen so many stars or the Milky Way so clear before.

nickleungphoto:

Finally have a reliable enough connection to update my blog. There are so many pictures I want to share from my Everest Base Camp Trek, but this is the one that took the most effort. After multiple nights of waiting for weather to clear, then learning that the Milky Way actually doesn’t come out of the horizon until after 1am, I finally got this shot outside of the village Gorak Shep at 3am.

At 16,900 ft, Gorak Shep is the last village before Everest Base Camp. At this elevation, it is difficult to sleep, which ironically, helped me get out of my sleeping bag into the freezing night. I’ve never seen so many stars or the Milky Way so clear before.

(via mattfractionblog)

187 notes

explore-blog:

An 11-year-old boy recreates David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest in Lego – a superb addition to these visual interpretations of the massive novel.

explore-blog:

An 11-year-old boy recreates David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest in Lego – a superb addition to these visual interpretations of the massive novel.

229 notes